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As the UK’s premier probate service, we expedite our applications whilst ensuring a clear, fixed, and all-inclusive legal fee for our customers

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Receive expert probate assistance from our
renowned team of grant of probate specialists

Our grant of probate service

From
£489
Fixed and inclusive legal fee[1]

Application completed by probate professionals and SRA regulated solicitors.

You will only need to answer a few simple questions and we will confirm what documents are needed for us to prepare the probate papers

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[1]Our fixed legal fee of £489 is tailored for customers with uncomplicated estates. In cases where customers need to report a complex estate to HMRC, we handle the entire process from start to finish, for a fixed and all-inclusive legal fee, which starts from £1,179.
* Terms and Conditions apply

Why choose our leading grant of probate service?

Our specialists will take care of your probate application from start to finish, relieving you of the time and effort involved, and providing you with peace of mind that every detail is handled correctly. Our team at Affinion Probate will:

  • Provide you with a dedicated case manager
  • Check the validity of the Will, or apply the Rules of Intestacy if there is no Will
  • Complete your probate application form
  • Prepare the statement of truth for the executors and or administrators to sign
  • Complete the inheritance tax forms (whether tax is due or not)
  • Calculate any inheritance tax liability
  • Apply for a grant of probate or letters of administration

And, if your probate application doesn’t go through for any reason we will give you a full refund of our legal fee.

This means you can try our service risk free – No fuss, no nonsense, no small print.

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Our streamlined probate process


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How our leading probate service can help you

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Book your free 30-minute consultation online.

To book your free 30 minute consultation online with a probate specialist, please select below:

Grant of Probate Letters of Administration

What is probate?

Probate is a legal process that occurs after someone passes away. It involves the court validating and executing the deceased person’s will (if they had one) or distributing their assets if they didn’t have a will. The primary purposes of probate are to:

Confirm the validity of the Will: If the deceased person had a will, the court verifies its authenticity and validity. This ensures that the wishes of the deceased regarding the distribution of their assets are legally recognized.

Appoint an executor or administrator: The court appoints an executor (if named in the will) or an administrator (if there is no will or no named executor) to manage the estate’s affairs. This person is responsible for gathering and managing assets, paying debts and taxes, and distributing assets according to the will or state law.

Settle debts and taxes: The estate’s debts and taxes, including income taxes, estate taxes, and any outstanding bills, are paid from the deceased person’s assets during the probate process.

Asset distribution: After debts and taxes are settled, the remaining assets are distributed to the beneficiaries according to the terms of the will or, if there is no will, according to the laws of intestacy.

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How Affinion Probate can help you

Affinion can help deliver a grant of probate (or letters of administration where appropriate) at a lower price and much faster than traditional Probate providers. We endeavor to obtain the grant for a fixed and inclusive fee of £489 and within just 30 working days*, both of which are industry leading.

Once you have the grant of probate this will allow you to complete the remainder of the estate administration yourself without the need to attend an interview at the Probate Court.

Making a personal application and obtaining a grant of probate takes on average 4 months and costs £273. Affinion will endeavour to deliver the Grant to you within just 30 to 40 working days and for a fixed and inclusive fee of £489*. We can deliver the Grant quickly and ensure that everything is dealt with efficiently and accurately, as we specialise in Probate and nothing else.

Our specialists appreciate that this can be a difficult time and if you are having to deal with a loved one’s estate, we can help. We will make the experience as stress-free as possible by removing the burdens and responsibilities of the application process from you.

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During your free probate consultation, one of our friendly specialists will help you work out:

0330 555 8000
The Affinion Probate Team

Frequently Asked Questions

In England and Wales, probate is generally required when a person passes away, and their estate meets certain criteria. The key factors that determine whether probate is necessary are as follows:

Estate value: Probate is typically required when the deceased person’s estate exceeds a certain threshold value. The government have set a threshold of £5,000 and if the estate’s value is below this threshold, probate may not be required. However, banks and other financial institutions may have their own requirements for releasing funds, and they may request a grant of probate even for smaller amounts.

Type of assets: Probate is generally needed for assets that are solely owned by the deceased person and cannot be transferred automatically to a surviving joint owner or beneficiary. This often includes property, bank accounts, investments, and personal property in the deceased person’s name alone.

No valid will (Intestacy): When a person dies without a valid will (intestate), probate is necessary to determine how their estate will be distributed according to the rules of intestacy. In such cases, the deceased person’s assets will be distributed according to the laws of England and Wales.

Complex estates: If the estate is complex, involves multiple beneficiaries, significant debts, or assets held in trusts, probate may be required to ensure proper administration and distribution.

Executor’s authority: Probate provides legal authority to the executor (or personal representative) appointed in the deceased person’s will to manage and distribute the estate’s assets. Without probate, banks and other institutions may not release funds or assets to the executor.

Disputed wills or beneficiaries: If there are disputes over the validity of the will, disagreements among beneficiaries, or concerns about the executor’s actions, probate may be necessary to resolve these issues through the probate court.

It’s important to note that the rules and thresholds for probate in England and Wales may change over time, so it’s advisable to consult with a legal professional who specialises in probate and estate matters to get the most up-to-date information and guidance for your specific situation. Additionally, the probate process in England and Wales involves applying for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration through the Probate Registry, and the process may vary depending on the circumstances of the estate.

Whether you need a grant of probate in England and Wales depends on the specific circumstances of the deceased person’s estate. Here are some key factors that determine whether a grant of probate is required:

Estate value: If the estate of the deceased person is valued above a certain threshold, typically £5,000, you will generally need a Grant of Probate. However, financial institutions may have their own thresholds for requiring probate, so it’s advisable to check with them.

Sole ownership: A grant of probate is usually required when the deceased person owned assets solely in their name. This includes real estate, bank accounts, investments, and personal property. Assets held jointly with someone else (e.g., joint tenancy with rights of survivorship) or assets with named beneficiaries (e.g., life insurance policies, pension accounts) may bypass probate.

Complex estates: If the estate is complex, involves multiple beneficiaries, significant debts, or assets held in trusts, probate may be necessary to ensure proper administration.

Named executor: If there is a valid will, and the deceased person named an executor, that executor will typically need to apply for a grant of probate to carry out their duties and responsibilities.

Dealing with financial institutions: Many financial institutions, such as banks and investment companies, require a grant of probate before they will release funds or transfer assets to the executor or beneficiaries.

Tax liabilities: If there are inheritance tax or estate tax liabilities, the grant of probate may be necessary to settle these obligations.

Other legal requirements: Certain legal and financial transactions may require a grant of probate, such as selling or transferring real estate owned by the deceased person.

It’s important to consult with a solicitor or legal professional who specialises in probate and estate matters to assess your specific situation. They can provide guidance on whether a grant of probate is required and assist you in the probate process if necessary. Keep in mind that probate rules and thresholds may change over time, so it’s important to get up-to-date information and legal advice tailored to your circumstances.

In England and Wales, having a valid will does not necessarily eliminate the need for probate. In fact, a valid will often requires probate to be executed and carried out. Here’s how it typically works:

Will with named executor: When a person creates a valid will, they typically name an executor (also known as a personal representative) who is responsible for administering their estate after their death. The executor’s role includes gathering the deceased person’s assets, paying debts and taxes, and distributing the remaining assets to the beneficiaries according to the terms of the will.

Applying for probate: Even with a valid will, the named executor may need to apply for a Grant of Probate from the Probate Registry. This grant is a legal document that confirms the validity of the will and grants the executor the legal authority to act on behalf of the deceased person’s estate.

Executor’s authority: With the Grant of Probate, the executor has the legal authority to access the deceased person’s assets, including bank accounts, investments, and property. Financial institutions and other parties may require the executor to provide the Grant of Probate as proof of their authority to act.

Debts and taxes: The executor is also responsible for settling any outstanding debts and paying any applicable inheritance taxes from the estate’s assets.

Distribution to beneficiaries: Once debts, taxes, and expenses are settled, the executor can distribute the remaining assets to the beneficiaries according to the terms of the will.

In summary, even if there is a valid will in England and Wales, probate is typically required to provide legal authority to the executor and ensure the proper administration and distribution of the deceased person’s estate. The probate process helps verify the authenticity of the will and ensures that the deceased person’s wishes, as expressed in their will, are carried out correctly.

However, if the deceased person’s estate is very small and doesn’t include significant assets, or if the assets are held in a way that they don’t require probate (such as joint tenancy with rights of survivorship or assets with named beneficiaries), probate may not be necessary. The specific circumstances of the estate will determine whether probate is required.

Yes, if a person dies without a will (intestate) in England and Wales, the process of administering their estate typically involves obtaining a grant of letters of administration rather than a grant of probate. While the terminology differs, the overall purpose is similar: to establish legal authority for someone to manage and distribute the deceased person’s assets.

Here’s what happens when someone dies without a will:

Application for letters of administration: Instead of an executor named in a will, an administrator is appointed. This person is typically a close relative of the deceased and is entitled to apply for a grant of letters of administration. The order of priority for who can apply is specified by law and is based on the relationship to the deceased.

Distribution according to intestacy rules: In the absence of a will, the estate will be distributed according to the rules of intestacy, which are set out in law. These rules determine who the beneficiaries of the estate are and in what proportions they will inherit.

Administering the estate: The administrator is responsible for gathering the deceased person’s assets, paying any debts and taxes from the estate, and distributing the remaining assets to the beneficiaries in accordance with the intestacy rules.

Grant of letters of administration: To carry out these responsibilities, the administrator typically needs to apply for a grant of letters of administration from the Probate Registry. This grant serves a similar purpose to a grant of probate—it provides the legal authority for the administrator to act on behalf of the deceased person’s estate.

So, even if there is no will, the process involves obtaining a grant of letters of administration to legally administer and distribute the deceased person’s assets. The administrator is bound by the rules of intestacy in determining how the estate is distributed. If you are in a situation where a family member has passed away without a will, you may need to consult with a probate specialist to guide you through the process of obtaining letters of administration and administering the estate according to the law.

Have a different question? Ask our friendly specialists today.

Our friendly specialists are happy to answer any probate questions you may have during your free consultation.

0330 555 8000

Our lines are open Mon-Sun 9am-7pm

Can’t speak now?
Book your free 30-minute consultation online.

To book your free 30 minute consultation online with a probate specialist, please select below:

Grant of probate Letters of administration